Lisa Marie Presley dies after cardiac arrest: reports — causes, risks

Lisa Marie Presley dies after cardiac arrest: reports — causes, risks

Lisa Marie Presley dies after cardiac arrest: reports — causes, risks

  • Lisa Marie Presley has died at the age of 54, her mother announced in a statement.
  • Elvis Presley’s daughter underwent CPR and was taken to West Hills Hospital in Los Angeles, reports say.
  • Cardiac arrests are more common in older people and men, but can happen to anyone.

Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of rock and roll legend Elvis Presley, has died of complications from cardiac arrest aged 54, according to reports.

“It is with a heavy heart that I must share the devastating news that my beautiful daughter Lisa Marie has left us,” her mother Priscilla Presley said in a statement Thursday. “She was the most passionate, strong and loving woman I have ever known.”

Paramedics rushed to Presley’s home in Calabasas after receiving a call that the singer was in cardiac arrest, according to TMZ. She would have received CPR and epinephrine would have been administered on the spot to help her take her pulse, before being transported to hospital.

A spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department told The Hollywood Reporter that deputies attended a property in Calabasas for an unnamed woman in her 50s who went into cardiac arrest. Firefighters took a pulse before she was taken to West Hills Hospital.

Cardiac arrests are more common in older people and men

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops beating and pumping blood throughout the body, depriving the brain of oxygen and leading to loss of consciousness and cessation of breathing, according to the British Heart Foundation.

Cardiac arrests can be caused by reasons such as heart attack, congenital heart disease, heart valve disease, inflammation of the heart (acute myocarditis), and inherited heart conditions such as cardiomyopathy. They can also be caused by electrocution, drug overdoses, severe bleeding and hypoxia, the BHF said.

If someone goes into cardiac arrest, they will suddenly collapse, lose consciousness, be unresponsive, and breathe abnormally (like panting) or not breathe at all, the BHF said.

Older people, men, and people with underlying heart conditions are at higher risk for cardiac arrest, but anyone can have one. Women are more likely than men to be older if they go into cardiac arrest, according to a 2019 study published in Circulation.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, about one in 10 cardiac arrests is related to physical exertion. More than 356,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur each year in the United States, nearly 90% of which are fatal, according to a 2022 report from the American Heart Association.

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